Tag Archives: Weis Words

An exciting new service

It’s been a long time since my last blog, but I have some exciting news to share and this is the ideal place to let everyone know about it.

This week I took and passed my UCF final and became a Certified Technical Writer. This opens up a new avenue of opportunity for Weis Words Writing.

Because this was my first college course since 1994, it took a little getting used to at first. However, the end result makes it worthwhile and there’s no telling what I might do next.

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Tuesday Weisblog: A day without baseball is a good day

When I was a kid, I played Little League Baseball and watched Major League Baseball religiously. I went to the local minor league games as often as anyone would take me to them. I used to be able to spew out players’ batting averages and earned-run averages like nobody’s business.

As I got older, I played baseball on my high school team and even did the beer league softball thing for two years.

As a 20-something adult (and even into my early 30s), I went to two Spring Training games every year.

Today, however, I want nothing to do with baseball. Each year, I rejoice the moment the World Series is over because SportsCenter won’t be wasting large chunks of their 60 minutes on baseball highlights and commentary.

You’re probably wondering what changed. If you know the answer to this riddle, you’ve figured it out: What do the years 1972, 1973, 1976, 1980, 1981, 1985, 1990, 1994 have in common? During each of these years, there was a Major League Baseball work stoppage. That’s eight – count ’em, EIGHT – work stoppages in a 22-season span.

The last one (in 1994) continued into 1995 and the World Series was canceled that year. So was my love of the game. I’d had enough.

Some people waste their time trying to figure out who’s responsible for this nonsense. “It’s the owners’ fault” or “It’s the players’ fault,” they say, but when there are eight work stoppages in 22 years there’s plenty of blame to go around for everyone – including the fans for being gullible lemmings and coming back to the stadiums each time. At the end of the day, the answer is simple: It all boils down to the almighty dollar and sheer greed.

Yes, other sports have had strikes or lockouts, too … and the NBA and NFL currently have labor issues that are causing serious doubt that agreements will be reached in time to start next season for both sports. If they are truly that arrogant, self-centered and idiotic, they deserve what they’ll get … reduced attendance and increased fan apathy. I can’t imagine either sport really going through with something like this in today’s economic world, because people like me and you might discover they can live just fine – thank you very much – without them. It took me all of about a week to figure that out with baseball.

Since the World Series was called off in 1995 I have not watched even one game, except for a very small handful I’ve tolerated simply as a courtesy to my friends who still actually care. I did let a friend of mine take me to Miller Park in Milwaukee on a non-game day to eat in a restaurant at their stadium, but that’s the closest I’ve gotten.

Congratulations to the San Francisco Giants, World Series Champions. Congratulations to me, too … baseball season is over!

Friday Weisblog: With Drew and Peyton ‘Manning’ the QB spots, the Super Bowl will be a ‘Brees’

In my last correspondence, I told you all about what was wrong with this year’s Super Bowl. What’s right with the game deserves equal time, so here goes …

Drew Brees led the NFL in touchdown passes this season. Peyton Manning was the league’s Most Valuable player. It could be rightly argued that each means more to his respective team than any two other players in the entire league – including the elderly #4 in purple.

But the goodness goes beyond that. These are two guys who are genuinely fine, upstanding people. They seem to always do and say the right things – and manage to stay off the rap sheet. What a concept!

Brees signed with the Saints four years ago when he could have gone to teams that were then far more glamorous than the Saints, who had recently suffered the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. He felt it was his calling to play there, and he and the Saints fans have developed a unique love affair for each other. He’s thrown for more than 4,000 yards four years in a row, including a mind-boggling 5,069 in 2008.

Meanwhile, Manning came into the NFL as the the top selection in the 1998 draft – and he has more than lived up to the hype. He’s thrown for more than 4,000 yards 10 of his 12 years, and has NEVER thrown fewer than 26 touchdown passes in any season, including his rookie campaign. The son of Archie Manning, ironically the Saints’ best-ever signal caller until Brees came to town, Peyton may very well go down as the best to ever play the game if he continues on his current pace.

This is a rare year. I will be happy with either team that wins the big game, largely because of their quarterback.

NOTE: Speaking of quarterbacks, kudos to Kurt Warner, who announced his retirement from the Arizona Cardinals today. Another of the league’s true gentleman, his was a true rags-to-riches story. Warner went from bagging groceries to the Arena League to NFL stardom, and he certainly belongs in the Hall of Fame. I think he gets there eventually.

Tuesday Weisblog: She was going pee when her fellow commissioners were going, “Yay,” or “Nay”

OK, so I had to resort to a little bathroom humor. A little juvenile, perhaps. But it actually fits … keep reading.

Wake County, North Carolina is not a big place. They have just seven county commissioners, and one, Democrat Harold Webb, had just suffered a stroke and was forced to step down. The candidate up for replacement was one Tony Gurley, a member of the GOP.

Discussion was spirited and the votes continued to come back 3-3 over and over again … in fact, they voted 13 times that way. At that point, Betty Lou Ward could take it no more and made an unscheduled “pit stop.”

When she returned, there was Gurley sitting in the commissioner’s chair, the result of a 3-2 vote that took place while she was using the facilities.

“Thanks, guys,” she said, tongue-in-cheek, when she returned from her powder room respite and saw him sitting there.

If that’s not strange enough, the commissioners’ next order of business was to elect a vice chairman. This time, the vote came down to a choice of Ward or Commissioner Paul Coble. Again … multiple deadlocks at three. More than five hours later, it still was not settled, and Commissioner Stan Norwalk, a diabetic, made a motion to order sandwiches due to his medical condition. This vote barely passed 4-2!

By 11 p.m. the commissioners voted more than 100 times, each one coming in at 3-3; the Democrats voting for Ward and the Republicans for Coble. Motions to recess or adjourn the meeting were dismissed, and the madness continued.

Finally, at 2 a.m. Commissioner Norwalk again asked for a recess because he hadn’t gotten his insulin shot. Coble then ended the political posturing, proclaiming that he “would not sit here and put Mr. Norwalk at risk.” A new vote ensued and Ward won 5-1, with Gurley being the sole Commissioner voting “no.”

It just goes to show that sometimes in the world of politics, it’s the party whose members have the strongest bladders that win the day.

Note: Thanks to my friend Trace who told me about this rather unusual political gathering.