Tag Archives: weiswords.com

An exciting new service

It’s been a long time since my last blog, but I have some exciting news to share and this is the ideal place to let everyone know about it.

This week I took and passed my UCF final and became a Certified Technical Writer. This opens up a new avenue of opportunity for Weis Words Writing.

Because this was my first college course since 1994, it took a little getting used to at first. However, the end result makes it worthwhile and there’s no telling what I might do next.

Is Tiger out of the Woods? He is with me.

Last Friday, Eldrick “Tiger” Woods, the world’s greatest golfer (and “Player of the Year” in more than one way), made a tearful statement telling the world he was sorry for his numerous indiscretions.

I am not blogging today to judge whether or not he was sincere; I will keep those comments to myself. What I am writing about is simply this: What has this gossip-centered planet come to when he has to apologize to the entire world?

He certainly doesn’t owe me an apology. He didn’t do anything to me.

How about you? Did he do anything to you? Didn’t think so.

He DOES owe an apology to his wife, his family and everyone else who has an important place in his life (but especially his wife). Whether his wife or the others accept his apology is up to them.

If he did the public statement to repair his public image (to get advertising dollars back), that’s one thing. If he did it because he felt he really needed or wanted to, that’s another.

I don’t like the things he did – and the number of times it appears he went astray. I feel genuine sympathy for the pain his wife is going through on a very public stage.

But he doesn’t have to worry about appeasing me with fancy speeches or emotional breakdowns. Mr. Woods owes me zip, zilch, nada … nothing.

Monday Weisblog: It’s funny and pathetic at the same time

Jay Leno

Jay Leno

I have always been a bit of a Jay Leno fan. His cartoonish-looking chin and his dry wit amuse me.

His new show starts tomorrow night, and I will certainly tune in – alternating between that show and Monday Night Football.

If you’ve seen any of the commercials for it, Leno does a lot of “man on the street” kind of interviewing, asking random people basic trivia to see what kind of knowledge they possess about current events. Of course, the most outrageous answers make it to the show.

One particular young lady was asked, “Who lives at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue?” She was unable to give the correct answer. Leno’s follow-up question was, “Who lives in a pineapple under the sea?” She quickly gave the correct answer, “Sponge Bob Square Pants.”

Another person told Leno they didn’t know WHERE the Gettysburg Address was located (as if it was a physical street address).

Still another person was shown a photo of an astronaut and told his last name was “Armstrong.” Leno then asked her what his first name was. “Louie,” she responded.

I’ll watch and laugh at such ignorance, but deep down inside it’s a little frightening. It’s becoming the norm in this country. It’s no wonder the rest of the world is running circles around us academically.

Friday Weisblog: Remembering 9/11

Much like everyone else, I still remember where I was on September 11, 2001. I was at work, at a company called Progressive Communications International in Lake Mary, FL.

One of my coworkers, Gilbert Cauthorn, regularly listened to news/talk radio on headphones. He gave us the report that the first plane had struck, and it didn’t even seem real, especially since we’d not seen any pictures at that point. It must have either been some guy with a death wish or a plane that simply went down, I remember thinking to myself. After all, we were the United States, and certainly no one would do anything that brash and calculated on our own soil.

Then the second plane hit, and by that point it was obvious to everyone what was happening. I was later to find out that a former coworker of mine at a local radio station had recently moved to New York to work in the Wall Street Journal building, which I understand is very close by. His account of that day is harrowing.

About two weeks after 9/11 I flew out to the area to see some of my clients in the greater New York area. This particular auto dealer, Paul Miller, dealt in high-end cars such as Bentley, Rolls-Royce, BMW, Land Rover, Porsche and more. Out of the goodness of his heart, he was taking back just-purchased vehicles (with no penalty) for people whose spouses had perished or been injured during the tragedy, who could no longer afford these big-ticket purchases. Very impressive, indeed.

That night, I decided to attend the New Jersey Devils NHL hockey game. It was their home opener – and I felt very privileged to be there. While the entire country mourned, it was nothing like the feelings experienced by those who lived right there in the immediate area.

Before the game began, there was a moment of silence honoring those whose lives were lost. Fifteen thousand people, and you could hear a pin drop. It was amazingly quiet, other than the tears being shed by those who felt a sense of loss. I had everything I could do to keep my own composure.

They also brought out the spouses of heroic firefighters who did not survive the ordeal. Again, the place was thick with emotion.

During the first intermission, they played a tape-delay of President Bush’s message to the country. A completely impromptu “USA … USA … USA!” chant broke out, and a mixture of pride and sadness filled my heart.

I guess what I am trying to say is, it was an unforgettable honor to be there. Eight years later, I still remember all of it vividly. Tomorrow, I’ll say a prayer for those who lost family members, friends and loved ones. I’ll give my well wishes to people like Paul Miller, who sacrificed a great deal for those who needed it – when they needed it most. And I’ll look back upon my trip to New York with a bittersweet feeling that will never leave me as long as I’m alive.

Thursday Weisblog: Terrelle Pryor drops the ball, figuratively.

Do you know what “eye black” is? It is a black substance you place underneath your eyes in order to help shade your eyes from the sun. You see it used quite often by football and baseball players. One such athlete wearing eye black this past weekend was Terrelle Pryor.

In case you’re not familiar with him, Pryor is the star quarterback for Ohio State University … or as they call it, THE Ohio State University.

It seems that Mr. Pryor had a special message inscribed into his eye black this past weekend that got some negative reaction … including from me. In large letters, it said “VICK,” in support of Michael Vick, who I’ve blogged about ad nauseum (perhaps the only more popular topic of mine is the “Octomom”).

Pryor did himself no favors when he was interviewed after last week’s game. You’d have thought he would be ready with a statement a little better than this: “Not everybody is the perfect person in the world. Everyone does … kills people, murders people, steals from you, steals from me, whatever. I just feel that people need to give him a chance.”

Sorry, Terrelle, but I have never killed anyone – and if I did, I would not necessarily deserve a second chance.

Terrelle Pryor deserves to be able to publicly support whoever and whatever he wants, and he’s certainly entitled to his own opinion. That said, THE Ohio State University PR staff should’ve tapped him on the shoulder and helped him be ready to defend his position a little better.

Wednesday Weisblog: Roll tape!

Canton, Ohio is the home of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. But right now, it’s also known for something altogether different.

Municipal Court Judge Stephen F. Belden was in the middle of a hearing to determine whether or not there was sufficient evidence to have Harry Brown’s case reviewed by a county jury. The 51-year-old Brown was charged with robbery and obstructing official business. He allegedly fought with personnel from a local Wal-Mart, who were attempting to prohibit Brown from shoplifting.

Once the proceedings began, Brown began complaining about the competence of his public defender, who Brown claimed did not do a sufficient amount of homework. Judge Belden informed Brown that he was not going to give him a new public defender; either he could represent himself or deal with it.

That did not sit well with Mr. Brown, who decided to continue arguing with the judge. Eventually, Judge Belden had his fill of the belligerent Brown, and he let Brown know he was upset under no uncertain terms.

“I’m gonna get some duct tape,” the judge said to Brown. If you keep interrupting me, I’m gonna have Mr. Smith (bailiff Jeffrey Smith) put it over your mouth, OK?”

Brown decided he wanted to just go back to the holding area for prisoners, but the judge told him he was staying right there. When Brown continued to yap back at him, Judge Belden made good on his promise.

“All right, duct tape. Duct tape the defendant,” Belden said.

Once Brown’s mouth was sealed, the judge ran the hearing without incident until he asked Brown if he had questions for a witness. “We’ll put some more (tape) back on if you decide to, uh, go back to your former, uh, disrespectful ways,” Judge Belden said.

Brown’s reply? “I’m not being disrespectful, Your Honor,” Brown said. “I think you’re being more disrespectful to me, as, you know …”

That was all the judge could stand. “OK, that’s it, that’s it. Prelim is over. You’re bound over. I find probable cause. You can go back, down in the basement,” retorted the judge.

As you might expect, Brown continued. “I want to ask him some questions.”

“Yoooooouuuuuuu … go ahead, take him away,” said the angry judge.

On his way out the door, Brown uttered obscenities.

“OK, you can get 30 more days on top of whatever you get, for contempt,” Belden shouted.

Brown claims he wants to file a complaint, saying what the judge did was “unethical.” As for Belden, he was not the least bit sorrowful for what he’d done.

“You have somebody who’s disruptive, you have to make a decision on the spot how to handle it,” he said.

NOTE: For audio of this interesting hearing, click here:
http://www.cantonrep.com/communities/canton/x1886195990/Canton-judge-orders-silence-in-the-court-with-duct-tape

Monday Weisblog: A most unwelcome piece of advice

Saturday afternoon, our family was at Flagler College moving my daughter, Chawney, into her new college dorm room. I knew that at some point, I was going to feel some sadness knowing that my daughter, who I’d just adopted in March, was not going to be accompanying us on the ride home.

That time came at around 4 pm Saturday, when the parents and students were ushered to separate “orientation” classes. One of the first things out of the mouth of one Daniel P. Stewart, Dean of Student Services, was that the parents needed to learn to “let go.” In other words, they had to let their kids make their own decisions and take responsibility for themselves.

When he said those two words, “let go,” I felt as if someone had kicked me flush in the stomach. I suddenly realized that I’d spent all last week trying to imagine what must be going through the heads of Chawney and/or my wife (Christina). This mother/daughter combo is as closely knit as two people in those roles could be.

In this one split second, I discovered I’d never actually taken the time to stop and consider how saying goodbye to someone who’s been an integral part of my life for the last six-plus years would affect ME. I was so worried about everyone else I didn’t really ever stop to deal with my own thoughts and emotions.

But now here we were and there was no turning back. I was going to have to say my goodbyes within the next couple hours, and quite frankly, I knew it was going to be something I was not prepared to handle.

It was everything I could do to not stand up and shout, “BITE ME, Daniel P. Stewart!”

See, what Mr. Daniel P. Stewart doesn’t understand is that I will NEVER let go, at least not completely. Sure, Chawney now has the ability to make decisions on her own and lead her own life, but I am always going to be her dad. I will always be there for her and her brother – no matter how old they are, where they live or what they become.

During dinner, our last “official” gathering together, we were all unusually quiet – and if you know “the Weises,” you know we are normally among the most chatty, animated families on the block. We all knew the time was drawing near, and there was no conversation or humor-driven banter that could gloss over the emotions we all felt.

I had an entire laundry list of emotions going on: I was proud simply to be the father of such a magnificent kid; I was feeling grateful for having Chawney under my roof for the last six-plus years; I was feeling cheated because I only had her under my roof for six-plus years; I was thrilled for Chawney because I do feel this is a great opportunity for her; and I was feeling sad that life as I knew it was never going to be exactly the same. Maybe it was a little selfish, but that latter one was by far the strongest.

Prior to dinner, I’d promised myself that because I was a man – and men don’t get all emotional, I would be strong for my wife and Chawney. But who was I kidding? I didn’t even make it through dinner before starting to cry – and I don’t mean just a little. I literally sobbed for the rest of the time we were there and about a third of the way home. Just re-living the moment now makes the water works start all over again.

“Let go.” You’re joking, right?

As Chawney closes one chapter of her life, I intend to be a part of the new one – even if it means going from being a major player to a “best supporting role.”

Bite me, Daniel P. Stewart!